Go Down Memory Lane As We Celebrate Our 15th Anniversary with Linda Henry, John Barros and Steve DiFillippo

By Michael McCarthy | September 1, 2020 | Feature

As Boston Common celebrates 15 amazing years, we asked some of the biggest and most important voices in the city to reflect on changes, triumphs and people. And, naturally, many of these superstars offer thoughts about their favorite magazine.

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Linda Henry
Managing Director, Boston Globe Media Partners, bostonglobe.com

“I’m proud to have grown up as a Boston girl and thrilled to still live here today. I love that we are wicked smart and determined. The energy of this city is unlike any other of its size, and the ideas of the people here continually inspire me. Over the past 15 years, change has been a constant for Boston. We’ve celebrated together after many championship wins and grieved together after the 2013 marathon bombing. We cemented our role as the national leader in industries like robotics and life sciences, have fostered an amazing startup culture and grown stronger together through nation-leading reform. Following national movements after the brutal killing of George Floyd, there has also been a resounding call for racial equity here. There is a shared belief that a better way is possible, that equity and justice is possible, but only with real change and accountability. I hope that this is a watershed moment for Boston to grow in its convictions, bridge the gaps that divide us, and rebuild in the way that this ‘city on a hill’ can live up to its potential...when we celebrate Boston Common’s next big anniversary.”

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John Barros
Chief of Economic Development, Boston, boston.gov

“I was born and grew up in Boston. What I love about my fellow Bostonians is the diversity of racial and ethnic backgrounds—we’re a global city and not afraid to show it. As chief of economic development, I’m committed to fostering greater economic inclusion and equity for all Bostonians. We’ve come a long way since 2005. For those of us who remember, the completion of the Big Dig project completely reenvisioned the face of downtown Boston, replacing an elevated highway with a beautiful park and linking our historic waterfront to the heart of the city. Boston has also rapidly become a global hub of innovation, spinning out startups, attracting venture capital and firmly establishing itself as the top life sciences ecosystem in the world, building on our renowned hospitals and academic community. However, I think what has changed the most is that we’ve seen more young people, immigrants and people of color taking ownership for Boston’s future and the opportunities available here. While there is still work to be done, today I’m excited to see that diversity reflected through representation and advocacy efforts by leaders within universities, businesses and other parts of civic life.”

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Steve DiFillippo
CEO, Davio's, davios.com

“Boston is my home. I went to Boston University and the Cambridge Culinary School. I’ve always loved to cook and serve people. The industry is so challenging, and you never know what each day will bring—I can’t wait to get to a restaurant every day. Obviously, COVID-19 has changed everything. One thing is certain: Davio’s isn’t going anywhere. [Over the past 15 years], the smartphone and the internet have really changed our industry. It has made it so much easier to communicate and to run our business. The other change is our guests; they’re so much more educated and really know what they want. The Seaport is by far the biggest change in Boston. We are blessed that Joe Fallon got it done. The man had a vision, and he sure did an amazing job for our city. I still remember the first time I read Boston Common magazine. It was unbelievable. The stories, the photography, the real estate advertisements. I just love it. It’s so much more than a magazine.”



Photography by: From top photo: by Heidi Hope; courtesy of boston.gov; courtesy of Davio's. Cover image and thumbnail by Todd Kent/Unsplash